Posts Tagged ‘thrift stores’

Soooooo. I know I’ve been a bit remiss in posting but I have been busy. In my defense I’ve had a few things to do, like shopping for wool for prezzies and going to the thrift store because they had women’s clothing half price and how can you resist a bargain like that especially since I found this spring coat, which is right on trend, for $3.00.

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And it looks great!  I just have to lose about 2 kilos (around 5lbs)  and it will fit perfectly.

I also found this 100% wool sweater from the GAP for $2.00.

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The picture doesn’t show the colour of the sweater but the collar and button bands are a deep plum and the body of the sweater a tweedy dark emerald.  It will be a nice warm sweater once winter really starts to blow.  I almost bought a robins egg blue 100% mohair sweater for $1.50 but it wasn’t my colour and the collar came right up under the chin.  I think that would drive me crazy and the previous owner probably would agree.

There really were some great bargains there.  My youngest daughter bought a really nice 100% wool coat for $10.00.  It’s a lovely shade of dark crimson and is double-breasted.  It looks great on her and she was looking for a good coat to wear out instead of her down jacket which is too hot to go walking around the stores in.  She also bought a GAP 100% lambswool cream-coloured sweater for $2.00 that will be really cozy on a cold day.  And, of course, we bought books.  Lots of books.  About 15 books.  But it’s hard to resist when you find interesting books from 1935.

I’ve said before how my kids will take a book as a present over just about anything else so when I told my daughter I would buy her some books as part of her Christmas present she kind of went overboard.  This is what we got:

1.  The Music Story Series – Printed in 1968 this book traces the history of hymnology and carolry from ancient Greece and Rome through to more modern times.  On the way it describes how this type of music gained in popularity and lost popularity through different eras.  It also contains sheet music and lots of examples of poetry that would have been set to music and sung on special occasions.  It’s looks to be very interesting especially to a musicologist like myself.

2.  Canadian Home Gardening – Printed in 1938 this book is exactly what it says.  I find these old gardening books interesting because they had to deal with enriching the soil and dealing with pests in an all natural way.  Also there weren’t the amount of hybrids or imported seed that we see now so it’s a good way to learn about native plants and what type are best for our climate.  Yes, our region is at least 1 degree warmer than what it was in 1935 but it should still give valuable information on the challenges of gardening in Canada.  The chapters are laid out by month so you know exactly what you should be doing and when.  Also any book that has a section called, “December, the Month Of Christmas – and the Annual Slaughter of Trees”  is a keeper.  For my green-thumbed daughter.

3.  The Good Housekeeping Needlecraft Encyclopedia – Printed in 1950 this book is an extensive look at everything to do with needlecraft.  If you can use a needle to do it, it’s in this book.  They even have a section on how to make your own fishing net.  It has everything from simple sewing to tailoring to tufting to net embroidery to rug making and weaving.  I love these old needlecraft, and homemaking, books because they often have tips and techniques that have long since lost favour but are very useful just the same.  After all, who knows when you may need to make a fishing net to catch your own cod fish?   For both my girls.  They both love needlecrafts of all kinds so should find this useful.

4.  Our Witchdoctors are too Weak – This is one I got for my daughter bought because it looks at a pair of missionaries who lived with a remote Amazonian tribe, Wilo, and learned about their language and customs as they try to teach them about God.  Now we are not Christians but it will still be interesting learning about the language and customs of people you never knew existed.  Now, I’m not one to agree with missionaries trying to convert people but there is no doubt that they do good work in any case so I try not to judge.  It looks like this book will be a fun read as the pieces I’ve already read are humourous without losing sight of the incredible difficulties these people face.

5.  Robert Service Biography – Robert Service is my favourite poet.  I love his romantic view of the high north.  I love how he paints the people who live there and I love his sense of humour.  He was also my Dads favourite poet and I still have the books he used to read.  I can still see him sitting in the kitchen chair with a cup of tea in one hand, a cigarette in an ashtray on the table and the book open in his other hand.  I can’t wait to read what motivated this man to want to live in the Yukon.

6. Phantoms in the Brain:  Probing the Mysteries of the Human Mind – Printed in 1998 so a little out of date but still useful in learning about the brain.

7.  Ideas and Opinions – This book is a collection of Albert Einstein’s most popular writings.  So it has his essays about relativity, nuclear war, religion, human rights, economics and the role of government.  I studied his philosophies a bit in university but always wanted to read more by the man.  Interesting fellow with a lot of good things to say.

8.  The Complete Woodsman – Printed in 1974 this book will give you all the information you will ever need to know about living out in the woods of Canada.  You can learn how to make a shelter, rafts, mocassins, bows and arrows, sun goggles, how to start a friction fire, how to navigate by the stars, which plants are safe to eat and which will kill you, and how to pack for travel in the forest.  Good things to know when the apocalypse comes.  Christmas present for dear daughter.

9.  The Workingman in the Nineteenth Century – Printed in 1974 this book is a collection of documents that paint a picture of the life of a workingman.  It talks about the formation of unions, working conditions, living conditions, his health, diet, recreations etc.  A good history lesson on the way ordinary people lived back in the day.  All the information is from books, newspapers and evidence supplied to the Royal Commission on the Relations of Labour and Capital of Canada, so it’s not just anecdotal evidence.  This is another Christmas present for my daughter.

10.  And here we come to a real treasure.  I bought these for my endlessly curious daughter.  This is a collection of five books from 1934, ’35, ’39, ’41, and ’45 entitled Funk and Wagnalls New Standard Year Book.  Along with these we also found and 1931 edition of Funk and Wagnalls New Standard Encyclopedia of Universal Knowledge.  The year books are exactly that.  They are books that chronicled the events and economic changes  that happened in countries around the world during that year.  These are going to be endlessly fascinating, I expect.  Can’t wait to find some time to sit down with one and just read until I pass out or something.  This is a great find for people like us that just love history and are always curious to know what went on before we were born.

These treasures aren’t the only things I bought today.  I also went to a yarn store.  *gulp*  And although I went with the intention of buying a couple of balls of Noro Silk Garden in order to make my oldest daughter a new pair of fingerless gloves to replace those she lost, I didn’t end up buying any.  Apparently she found them at the bottom of her backpack.  But I didn’t learn this until I had already crossed the river Styx and entered into Satan’s lair.  I have no excuse whatsoever for what transpired after I opened that door.  I have very little recall as to how the yarn I am now staring at found its way into the plastic bag that sits at my feet.

Just in case you are wondering, this is what followed me home:

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Three skeins of Manos del Uruguay Wool Clasica in Flame colour #115.  The picture doesn’t really show how vibrant this colour is.  I was thinking of knitting someone a cowl.  Or maybe two someones because that is a lot of yarn.  Approx. 414 yds. of a bulky weight pure wool.  It’s gorgeous.

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One skein of Cascade Heritage Silk Paints in the Vino colourway #9958. It matches the Manos pretty well so I thought I could make a pair of gloves or fingerless mitts for that someone. There is 437 yds. per skein so I might be able to eke out two pair of fingerless mitts for two someones if I’m really careful.

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Four skeins of Cascade Yarns Pastaza in #068.  It’s no longer available which is a shame since it is a nice, soft Llama/wool blend.   I was going to make a cowl for the same someone but changed my mind because I like the Manos better.  So now I have 528 yds. to make something out of.  Still could make a couple of cowls.  They never go unappreciated and in this weight are a quick knit.  And last but not least:

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Two skeins of Cascade Yarns Pastaza in #079.  This is a rich, deep forest green.  Love the colour.  This is for me although I haven’t a clue what to make of it yet.  I may go back and get the rest of this because I left about four more skeins behind.  And there were a couple of skeins in the blue and one in a mulberry colour and one in a camel colour…

Oh, yarn, you sweet siren you, calling my name until I am helpless to resist your allure.  Your bright colours, your soft texture, your endless possibilities!  I am powerless, impotent, to resist you.  Oh, yarn, I shared my hopes for the future with you, my dreams of what you could be, lofty goals of that wonder of wonders – the perfect sweater,  and, oh!, the many disappointments you have thrown at me when you refuse to live up to the swatch .  Yarn, to quote Pablo Neruda, “I love you as certain dark things are to be loved, in secret, between the shadow and the soul.”  except I don’t love you in secret.  I love you openly, wantonly, with passion.  Oh, yarn, look at me, a woman covered in lint, with knitting needles in one hand and an empty wallet in the other.

Oh, yarn, why do you torture me so?

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After posting yesterday about my stash, I decided that I would sort out my sock yarn to see how much I really had. It’s a sad, sad, sad state of affairs when your sock yarn out numbers the money in your bank account. True story.

I also decided that I would get busy and finish the socks I have on the needles. The one pair are a simple toe-up knit 3 purl 2 rib with a single rib cuff and really don’t take long at all to knit. And the other pair are a toe-up in a box stitch pattern and don’t take long to knit. I figured out the reason I didn’t finish that pair is because I was trying to figure out which heel would be best suited for that pattern.

Considering how small socks are it’s amazing how many options you have to knit them. My go-to is a toe-up sock because I like trying them on as I knit. The other advantage is that you can see how the thing is going to look on the foot so if you have a complicated pattern in mind it’s good to be able to see if it will work or if it will be uncomfortable. Also some patterns, like cables, pull the pattern in so you need to add stitches to accommodate for the loss in width. If you don’t do that you can end up with a sock that is too tight and the cables end up stretched out. Not a pretty sight. I also like toe-ups because I’m lazy and I don’t like taking the time to kitchener stitch the ends together. Yes, I am that lazy.

My go-to heel is usually the wrap and turn heel (Knitty.com has a very good article on socks and discusses various heel options). I like the way it fits my foot and I find it a quick way of turning the heel. I also find it easier to remember. However, if I’m using a dark sock yarn then I go with a flapped heel because trying to see those wraps on a dark yarn with bad eyes is a lesson in frustration. And since I have enough frustrations and knitting is supposed to be relaxing I say forget that crap and go for simplicity.

So I’ve had a really productive day. I got one pair of socks finished and off the needles, blocking on the floor in the family room (heated floors are wonderful for blocking knits) which by now are either being sat on by a cat, dragged around the floor by a cat, or bunched up in the towel against the wall by a cat. Heated floors may be great for blocking knits. Cats? Not so much. I don’t mind the hair, I figure it makes them warmer but I do like to have the knits that I took the time to lay out on the floor to look like someone cared for them instead of like they were used to mop spills. I generally don’t pin socks for blocking and if I have a bigger piece(s) that I need pins for I put it up on the wide bookshelves we have. Cats don’t like pins and I don’t like vet bills so I think it’s best to keep the two separated.

The sock stash filled two bins. One bin full of Patons Kroy and the other bin is full of misc. sock yarn of various wools and cottons. Well, I did say that Kroy is my favourite sock yarn, didn’t I? And this is my favourite colourway. It knits up into a nice striped pattern of red/brown/grey that I find very appealing. It may not be exciting but I like it. But I like red in all its glory and variations so anything that has a bit of red in it generally gets my attention.

This is my one of my current favourite knitting books on socks. This is my other favourite. I love the Finnish Paivatar Socks in the Knitting Socks from Around the World. I love the colour work and the toe and heel details. I would never knit them in white. Around my house socks that start out white end up grey in no time. We have a dog and that means the floors are sometimes not as clean as they should be so white socks are worn rarely around here. And I love just about every pattern in Around the World in Knitted Socks. You do have to have experience in knitting socks in order to follow these patterns, though. Stephanie Van Der Linden includes basic instructions with clear pictures at the back of the book which is very welcome.

One of the best sources for good solid knitting patterns is my perennial favourite, the local thrift store. You can usually find old Patons Beehive booklets for next to nothing. Some that I have found are long out of print and those that aren’t, well, you can’t beat the price. My favourite of these is the Socks, Mitts and Gloves for Children booklet. It has good basic patterns that are easily modified to make something truly unique. I also like this book for the same reason, simple basic patterns that you can customize anyway you like.

I knit socks in fits and spurts. When fall rolls around and the leaves start turning I start feeling the itch to have warm feet. Warm feet for me is a pair of comfy hand-knit socks. So out come the needles, I prefer double points although I have certainly used the magic loop method, and on goes the TV and any night of the week you will find me watching the new crop of shows while socks come flying off the needles. This fall I have been knitting to: Sean Saves the World; The Crazy Ones; Mom; Game of Thrones (not technically a new show this fall but a new to me show and has there ever been a better written, and acted, character than Tyrion Lannister?); The Blacklist, and Agents of S.H.E.I.L.D. I have to say that I knit a lot slower during Game of Thrones. And it may be because my little heart goes pitty-pat whenever Peter Dinklage is on-screen. What a great actor! If anyone was going to make me end my fake marriage to George Clooney it would be Peter Dinklage.

Today the Yarn Harlot had the audacity to mention these verboten words “about 27 days to knit”. I don’t know what she was thinking because if anything is going to put a jinx on Christmas knitting it is the acknowledgement that there are only a finite number of days left to accomplish it in. I have approximately ten pairs of socks to knit. On average if I forgo eating and insert a caffeine drip, I can churn out a pair of socks in a little over two days. Maybe two days if I wear Depends so I don’t have to take time out to go to the bathroom. Eww, I just reread that. That sounds so gross! Anyway you look at it there is no way I am going to get all those socks done and the handwarmers for my daughter and a sweater for my other daughter and a couple of hats for some people I know and I think I want to knit a shoulder wrap for my upcoming Christmas party. Don’t you roll your eyes at me. I know I still have to finish the sweater I started for last weeks Christmas party. And I also know I have twenty days to find a pattern, find the yarn, find the needles, and find the time to sit down and knit a lace shawl. *sigh*

Why do I think I can knit faster than I actually can? Knitters optimism? Pride? Denial? Have I overdosed on lanolin causing me to have delusions of grandeur? I really need a time turner like Hermione had in Harry Potter. Or maybe if I could find a radioactive sheep and if it bit me I would gain super knitting powers. Or would that just make me sprout glow-in-the-dark wool from the top of my head?

Well, with only five more Saturday’s until the eat-fest, gift-giving, gift-receiving, gift-returning, lame excuse-making, tacky ornament display making, tree murdering, over-spending spree day is here. Yes, I mean Christmas.

I don’t do Christmas, at least not in the traditional way. We don’t decorate, don’t put up a tree but that’s mostly due to cats and my husbands ennui, and gift-giving is usually minimal. For me, I’m not a Christian and I feel hypocritical and disrespectful to partake in something I don’t believe in. And I abhor that something that was/is religiously relevant for some people has been made into a crass, commercialized exercise in proving who loves someone more by the gifts they give.

You know I’m right even if no one wants to admit it otherwise hand-crafted, hand-made, and home-baked gifts would get more respect. But unless the person has specifically asked for a hand-made gift the usual response is, “Oh, you made that yourself? How lovely and thoughtful.” and then you never see the gift again until you are in a thrift store you happen to come across the sweater. Or if you give home-made cookies, or breads, or soaps, or hand embroidered dish clothes/pillow covers etc. the words may say one thing but the face is saying quite another. Meanwhile they coo over the new iPhone their dad/mom/grandparent/lover/husband/wife/mailman gave them.

Now not everyone is like that. There are a lot of people who like hand-made things. When my daughters were small some of their favourite gifts were the toys I made for them. I knit farm animals, sweaters, socks, hats, mittens, or sewed stuffed animals, dresses, costumes, or duvet covers. One year I made a duvet for my oldest daughter. She still has it. I enjoyed making them things that no one else had. Now that they are older, hand-made things aren’t as appreciated as much and, more so my eldest daughter, store-bought things are worn while the stuff I made sits in a drawer somewhere. I usually end up giving her a gift card so she can just buy her own things. And this is why I don’t like Christmas.

I really don’t see the point in asking someone for a Christmas list, taking the time to make a thoughtful choice, spending the time in the store looking for and paying for said item and knowing that, in all reality, they could have bought the damn thing themselves. And now that she is working there really isn’t anything I could afford to buy her that she just can’t get herself. My younger daughter not so much.

This year, however, I decided that I’m having a very home-grown Christmas, very low-key with all gifts either home-made or thrift store purchases. Have I started on any of these incredible gifts. No. But I did start looking through patterns and matching them to wool. And I also took a good look around the thrift store the other day. What can I get at a thrift store that my kids might like? Books. Books are the one thing that will make my girls happy no matter what. So books are always a high priority gift item. Then there is the glassware, accessories and the happy accidents you can stumble upon. Like finding a copy of The Absolute Sandman Vol. III by Neil Gaiman, for $20cdn. Or a sweaters worth of Briggs and Little Regal yarn in the Horizon Blue colourway for $.49cdn each. Or finding a stash of vintage knitting needles and getting 12 sets for $1.00.

Now my kids love that sort of thing. I’m lucky and I know it. I am also fortunate in that most of my relatives love getting hand-knits, especially cotton socks. My father-in-law and my sister-in-law are both diabetics and say the cotton socks I make for them are by far the most comfortable they have worn. So socks will be very appreciated. I also plan on making some cashmere gloves, cowls and hats for various people. Cashmere is such a lovely yarn but expensive so the things that only take one or two balls make gift giving a little more affordable. I also have some very lovely silver silk yarn which was given me (I have no idea what brand) that will make a wonderful tie or skinny scarf for someone. I might splurge and get some store-bought items but since neither my husband or I currently have jobs they would have to be inexpensive. Well, I have a job but it’s part-time and they’ve cut my hours. Well, technically they didn’t, they just hired a couple more staff which amounts to the same thing. More staff means fewer hours for us all.

If I have to buy anything, it will probably be the following (if I can’t find some of them at the thrift store or used book store):

The Girl Who Played With Fire
The Girl Who Kicked a Hornet’s Nest – my girls have both read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo but we haven’t been able to find these used and they want to read them

Sherlock – the BBC series starring Benedict Cumberbatch (don’t you just love that name?) *I had originally put Elementary but as anyone who has watch these to shows will attest, they are very, very different.

The Game of Thrones – not the books, we have them, but the television series

The Borgias – because my kids loved it but didn’t see all of them

Supernatural – because who doesn’t love Dean and Sam

The Knitters Book of Wool – for my sheep loving daughter

A Sephora gift card – for my make-up loving daughter

Some Godiva chocolate – for my staff

Some treats for the cats, dog, rabbit and degus – we generally don’t give them many treats but since I make them dress up for the occasion, I have to reward them. Well, I dress up the dog and then shame him on Facebook but I just may have to put a Santa hat on the bunny this year. She’s just so darn cute. And since she has cancer I don’t know how long we will have her so it makes sense to humiliate her before she hops over to the other side. I would shame the cats, they really do deserve it for all the things they make me do and do to me, but they have sharp pointy everything that I’ve kind of learned my lesson and tend to leave them alone.

I can’t think of anything else. My husband and I don’t exchange gifts so I don’t have to worry about him and I really wouldn’t be giving gifts if people didn’t expect something so that’s what the cashmere is for. It makes a beautiful gift for anyone.

I have to say this job hunting right before Christmas sucks like a big sucking black hole but there’s nothing you can do about it. You just have to keep applying to jobs and going to interviews and sending out resumes and sooner or later something will stick. Hopefully sooner rather than later because I don’t cherish the thought of trying to sell my home at Christmas time.